The never-ending boat projects

We bought Chip-Chip in the fall of 2015. At first we thought that we would want to redo the electrical systems and maybe get some new sails, but of course there’s always some hidden issues when you buy a boat. The first winter ended up with a number of projects. Continue reading

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Lithium battery setup: A first plan

We are pretty sure we want lithium batteries (LiFePO4) in Chip-Chip. Mostly because we don’t have a lot of space, and as lithiums can be discharged to about 20%, they will give us more power in less space and with a lot less weight.

But lithiums are fairly sensitive, so it is necessary to carefully think the electrical system through before installing them. Our first thought was toย  buy a “plug-and-play ” lithium setup, which includes a BMS system. This seems like the easiest solution, but the more we learned about lithiums, the more uncomfortable it made us not knowing the details of the system. Continue reading

Light in the cave – or painting the interior

Dark teak interiors are valued in the Danish boating community – strange since we all seem to favor ย light Nordic design. Chip-Chip has been owned by people who have loved to sail, and to sail far. Consequently, countless screw holes in the teak reminds us of long forgotten instruments, storing containers, fire extinguishers etc. And the interior is somewhat worn. Practically it doesn’t really matter, but still… Continue reading

Restoring the teak seats

“STOP PULLING THE WOOD!!!!” Mattis jumped when I started screaming at him. It was summer and he had been playing in the cockpit, and was checking out how the seats were made of marine plywood with a teak coverage. Only problem was that the teak coverage was basically paper thin and peeling off. And while it’s not really a big issue, it’s not aesthetically pleasing, and if the teak is not fixed, the marine plywood below would slowly be damaged by the water creeping in. Continue reading

Renovating the rudder

We new from the beginning that our Great Dane had previously had issues with small blisters on the rudder. But it sucked a bit that the few small blisters that were there when she was lifted on land in the fall just seemed to increase as the winter went by. As ourย ย Great Dane was built in 1970, and thus is currently 46 years old, with the original rudder still on, it’s really no surprise that rudder issues are starting to show up. But it’s a lot of work. Continue reading