Quick stops in Antigua and St Maarten on our way north

We decided to go straight to to Antigua from Martinique, which meant that we passed both Dominica and Guadeloupe. Many sailors say that Dominica is their favorite island, but we figured that since activities in Dominica are land based, and something you need to pay for, it wouldn’t match with how we usually like to travel.

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Anchored next to youtube royalty

We arrived in Antigua just after sunrise, following a close hauled sail through the night. We anchored in Falmouth Harbour, and I went in to get us checked in to the country just around the corner at Nelson’s Dockyard in English Harbour. Later, we all sailed in to go through the dockyards, which were used as a safe haven by the English navy from the early eighteenths century. The place has been restored, and is now still a harbour, mainly for the super rich. It was nice to see, but one visit was enough for us.

Later, we found a nice hike from Falmouth Harbour to the entrance of English harbour. A bit challenging at times but with a beautiful view. We ended up staying just two nights in Antigua, before moving on to St Maarten.

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Laundry day

The sail to St Maarten was the best we have had since arriving in the Caribbean, with steady winds from behind and waves that were not too big. We anchored in the Dutch part of the bay, and prepared for some windy days ahead. The bay wasn’t that protected from swell, and we had some rolly days at anchor. One of the days, the legendary ocean racing yacht “Maiden” was on a mooring close to us, and we made sure to go by and take a couple of photos. Pretty cool.

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The ocean racer Maiden

The area around the bay wasn’t exactly charming, but one of the days we took a walk along the windy beach to the place where planes land and take off right over the sun bathers. Fun to experience. But all in all, St Maarten wasn’t where we wanted to be, and as soon as the winds and waves calmed down, we were off to spend christmas in the US Virgin Islands – which used to be Danish.

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