Towards the Fram Strait

As the plane approached Tromsø, we could see the rugged coast line below, with the islands of Lofoten clearly standing out. We landed in bright sunshine, marveling at the beautiful landscape around us. The trip had started at three in the morning when the sound of my alarm clock woke me up, and at four, before the sun had risen, a bus with passengers still half asleep left the Alfred Wegener Institute and headed for Hamburg airport. In Oslo our group met up with those who had flown from Bremen, and soon we were on our way towards Tromsø where the research vessel Polarstern was waiting.

We spent the night in a hotel at the water front, and in the morning I had the opportunity to take a walk along the harbor and across the bridge that connects the island with the mainland. The sun was shining brightly and the scenery absolutely breathtaking.

A bus picked us all up and drove us the short way to the fuel dock where Polarstern was waiting. Inside, we found our rooms and I found out I would was in a room with Laura and Claudia. I never even new that Polarstern had rooms for more than two people, but ours was really nice, with a section for use during the day and a section with beds that was somewhat closed off, making it easier to sleep while others are awake in the main room. This is great because the ship continues working during the night, so those on the night shift will have an easier time sleeping during the day.

It turned out that we would have to stay at the fuel dock until early evening, so we took the opportunity to go back to Tromsø for a couple of hours. It was Sunday, so the only stores that were open were the souvenir shops and the cafes. Laura got a thermo cup with northern light on it, and Claudia got a present for her husband. We went to the Polar Museum, which looked pretty small, but had elaborate exhibitions of the Norwegian early explorers like Nansen and Amundsen, and it displayed the story of the hunters who would over winter on Svalbard to hunt for walrus, polar bear and seals. Crazy lives they had. They had a shop selling books about the Polar ocean, but I didnt find Nansens books about the Fram expedition, which were bought by my great grandmother and I now have at home – it turned out that they were part of the exhibition inside

In the evening Polarstern started moving slowly away from the dock, and soon we were steaming out between the beautiful and majestic Lofoten Islands in the midnight sun. Most people were on the deck above the bridge, but it was cold and windy, and soon there was only a few people left. We entered the Norwegian Sea around midnight and continued northwards towards Svalbard and the Fram Strait.

Where to go on a sailing holiday

I asked Runa what she likes best about sailing. “I don’t like sailing!” was the answer. This is something we practice with her – to notice the good thing that happens and not just remember what you didn’t like so much. So I asked her again, there must be something nice about sailing, right? “Maybe walking the little paths on Nordbjerget” she said. That was on Anholt last year. We talked a bit longer, and it turned out that we she really likes is exploring a new place. I like that too. Arriving somewhere and go out and see the place you ended up in. Actually, I like it so much that I’m dead set on not visiting the sailing grounds south of Funen, which I have visited plenty of times with my parents throughout my childhood.

Esben and I want to take some overnight trips to see if we can make it work and to get a bit further away faster. Since our base is currently in Bremerhaven on the west coast of Germany, it would make sense to go somewhere around here. But we honestly don’t find the sailing great here – always having to pay attention to the tides, either on the North Sea, or in the shallow channels behind the Frisian islands.

So we thought about going to Scotland. But that required somewhat nice weather for the kids not to hate us forever. But as the departure date approached, and we saw one low pressure system after the other building up in the North Atlantic we came to accept that we would be visiting the Baltic once again. This time we aim for Bornholm.