Restoring the teak seats

“STOP PULLING THE WOOD!!!!” Mattis jumped when I started screaming at him. It was summer and he had been playing in the cockpit, and was checking out how the seats were made of marine plywood with a teak coverage. Only problem was that the teak coverage was basically paper thin and peeling off. And while it’s not really a big issue, it’s not aesthetically pleasing, and if the teak is not fixed, the marine plywood below would slowly be damaged by the water creeping in.


So we asked my dad if he would let us work on the seats in his workshop during easter. That way he could give us advice on how to proceed while we were working, and we had the local boat builder down the road for extra advice and for materials.

By measuring at the location of the hinges, we figured that the old teak pieces had been 5mm thick originally, and we then asked the local boat builder to cut a teak plank into small pieces. We wanted to take the old seats apart and use the old teak as templates for the new pieces, and after much work we finally had the marine plywood, a pile of old crappy teak an the side pieces kinda preserved.


It took forever, but finally we started building the seats up again. We used Sika 291i sealant, both for gluing the teak onto the plywood, as well as for the joints.

We put sika on the seats, added the teak carefully with dividers in between them, and then put compression on while they dried out. Once dry (so the next day), the protruding teak pieces had to be cut off, and then it was time for the side pieces. These were cut out individually, using the old pieces as templates, and then glued and screwed onto the seats. Finally we added sealant to the joints. To avoid having sika everywhere, my dad told us tape it up; you sand the sealant off afterwards, but it penetrates the wood and leaves a slight color that is not directly visible, but you sense it anyways. So the tape went on. The last day, we worked late into the night, but finally had four finished seats to bring home. Now we just had to sand them.

In the end it was not easy getting the hinges back in the right place, but we managed and now have lovely seats. But most importantly, we learned how to work with teak, so next time we can do it ourselves – just need to invest in some nice tools first…

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Installed! Now we just need to fix the rest of the wood…

 

 

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