Small house living – why?

We don’t really have a tiny house, but considering that there’s four of us sharing our 85 m2 we do have a relatively small apartment. What we have is two bedrooms, combined kitchen and livingroom – and a garden. We actually wanted more space, it seems that everybody has more space, right? But it turns out that small works out great for us, at least so far. Continue reading

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Renovating the rudder

We new from the beginning that our Great Dane had previously had issues with small blisters on the rudder. But it sucked a bit that the few small blisters that were there when she was lifted on land in the fall just seemed to increase as the winter went by. As our  Great Dane was built in 1970, and thus is currently 46 years old, with the original rudder still on, it’s really no surprise that rudder issues are starting to show up. But it’s a lot of work. Continue reading

Sea-ice in our model

To understand how the Arctic sea ice is changing and how it affects for example the underlying ocean currents, we work with a global sea ice ocean model (FESOM). For the last few years, a lot of effort has been put into improving the representation of the sea ice in the model. One focus has been on the large cracks – or leads, to use the correct name, that we know exist in reality. These are very difficult to capture in large scale models, but my colleague Qiang has now succeeded in modelling these leads and has put a video of the results on youtube. In this run, the horizontal resolution is 4.5 km in the Arctic Ocean. That’s quiet high.

Afloat

Despite of my broken arm, we managed to get Chip-Chip back in the water this past weekend with the help of my father. The crane arrived before 8.00 and left an hour later when Chip-Chip was nicely tied to the dock in the marina.

As soon as she was in the water, the kids were on board (Don’t worry, life jackets were on right after the picture was taken). Continue reading

An accident in Denmark

Crushed. That’s the word the doctors used to describe the bones in my right arm after I slipped an fell 3m down on hard ground from our sailboat. I am not even sure what happened, I wanted to remove some tape, it was a bit slippery after the rain, and suddenly I felt myself falling. I screamed when I hit the ground, and then I stopped because I couldn’t breathe. When I regained control of my breath I screamed for help, and I could see a man come running towards me. Continue reading

Changes in Arctic sea ice

I knew that climate change was occurring when I started working at AWI, but I was not aware of how rapidly the temperature is changing in the Arctic or to what extent it has changed the area of the sea-ice.

The thing is, that while temperatures are increasing all over the planet, the increase happens faster in the Arctic than anywhere else; studies show that the mean Arctic temperature in 2010 was 4 degrees C warmer than the average for 1968 to 2010. And 2010 was not a particularly warm year. Continue reading